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Thanksgiving Pet Safety

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Thanksgiving Pet Safety

by the AVMA  https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/thanksgiving-pet-safety.aspx

Thanksgiving is a special holiday that brings together family and friends, but it also can carry some hazards for pets. Holiday food needs to be kept away from pets, and pet owners who travel need to either transport their pets safely or find safe accommodations for them at home. Follow these tips to keep your pets healthy and safe during the holiday.

Poison Risks

Overindulging in the family feast can be unhealthy for humans, but even worse for pets: Fatty foods are hard for animals to digest. Poultry bones can damage your pet’s digestive tract. And holiday sweets can contain ingredients that are poisonous to pets.

  • Keep the feast on the table—not under it.  Eating turkey or turkey skin – sometimes even a small amount – can cause a life-threatening condition in pets known as pancreatitis. Fatty foods are hard for animals to digest, and many foods that are healthy for people are poisonous to pets – including onions, raisins and grapes. If you want to share a Thanksgiving treat with your pet, make or buy a treat that is made just for them.
  • No pie or other desserts for your pooch. Chocolate can be harmful for pets, even though many dogs find it tempting and will sniff it out and eat it. The artificial sweetener called xylitol – commonly used in gum and sugar-free baked goods – also can be deadly if consumed by dogs or cats.
  • Yeast dough can cause problems for pets, including painful gas and potentially dangerous bloating.
  • Put the trash away where your pets can’t find it.  A turkey carcass sitting out on the carving table, or left in a trash container that is open or easily opened, could be deadly to your family pet. Dispose of turkey carcasses and bones – and anything used to wrap or tie the meat, such as strings, bags and packaging – in a covered, tightly secured trash bag placed in a closed trash container outdoors (or behind a closed, locked door).
  • Be careful with decorative plants. Don’t forget that some flowers and festive plants can be toxic to pets. These include amaryllis, Baby’s Breath, Sweet William, some ferns, hydrangeas and more. The ASPCA offers lists of plants that are toxic to both dogs and cats, but the safest route is simply to keep your pets away from all plants and table decorations.
  • Quick action can save lives. If you believe your pet has been poisoned or eaten something it shouldn’t have, call your veterinarian or local veterinary emergency clinic immediately. You may also want to call the ASPCA Poison Control Hotline: 888-426-4435. Signs of pet distress include: sudden changes in behavior, depression, pain, vomiting, or diarrhea. Contact your veterinarian immediately.

Precautions for Parties

If you’re hosting a party or overnight visitors, plan ahead to keep your pets safe and make the experience less stressful for everyone.

  • Visitors can upset your pets. Some pets are shy or excitable around new people or in crowds, and Thanksgiving often means many visitors at once and higher-than-usual noise and activity levels. If you know your dog or cat is nervous when people visit your home, put him/her in another room or a crate with a favorite toy. This will reduce the emotional stress on your pet and protect your guests from possible injury. If your pet is particularly upset by houseguests, talk to your veterinarian about possible solutions to this common problem.
    Learn about dog bite prevention.
    • If any of your guests have compromised immune systems (due to pregnancy, some diseases, or medications or treatments that suppress the immune system), make sure they’re aware of the pets (especially exotic pets) in your home so they can take extra precautions to protect themselves.
    • If you have exotic pets, remember that some people are uncomfortable around them and that these pets may be more easily stressed by the festivities. Keep exotic pets safely away from the hubbub of the holiday.
  • Watch the exits. Even if your pets are comfortable around guests, make sure you watch them closely, especially when people are entering or leaving your home. While you’re welcoming hungry guests and collecting coats, a four-legged family member may make a break for it out the door and become lost.
  • Identification tags and microchips reunite families. Make sure your pet has proper identification with your current contact information – particularly a microchip with up-to-date, registered information. That way, if they do sneak out, they’re more likely to be returned to you. If your pet isn’t already microchipped, talk to your veterinarian about the benefits of this simple procedure.
    Learn more about microchips.
  • Watch your pets around festive decorations. Special holiday displays or candles are attractive to pets as well as people. Never leave a pet alone in an area with a lit candle; it could result in a fire. And pine cones, needles and other decorations can cause intestinal blockages or even perforate an animal’s intestine if eaten.

Travel Concerns

Whether you take your pets with you or leave them behind, take these precautions to safeguard them when traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday or at any other time of the year.

Your pet needs a health certificate from your veterinarian if you’re traveling across state lines or international borders, whether by air or car. Learn the requirements for any states you will visit or pass through, and schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to get the needed certificate within the timeframes required by those states.
Learn more about health certificates.

Never leave pets alone in vehicles, even for a short time, regardless of the weather.

Pets should always be safely restrained in vehicles. This means using a secure harness or a carrier, placed in a location clear of airbags. This helps protect your pets if you brake or swerve suddenly, or get in an accident; keeps them away from potentially poisonous food or other items you are transporting; prevents them from causing dangerous distractions for the driver; and can prevent small animals from getting trapped in small spaces. Never transport your pet in the bed of a truck.
Learn more about properly restraining pets in vehicles.

Talk with your veterinarian if you’re traveling by air and considering bringing your pet with you. Air travel can put pets at risk, especially short-nosed dogs. Your veterinarian is the best person to advise you regarding your own pet’s ability to travel.

Pack for your pet as well as yourself if you’re going to travel together. In addition to your pet’s food and medications, this includes bringing medical records, information to help identify your pet if it becomes lost, first aid supplies, and other items. Refer to our Traveling with Your Pet FAQ for a more complete list.

Are you considering boarding your dog while you travel? Talk with your veterinarian to find out how best to protect your pet from canine flu and other contagious diseases, and to make sure your pet is up-to-date on vaccines.

Food Safety

Don’t forget to protect your family and loved ones from foodborne illnesses while cooking your Thanksgiving meal. Hand washing, and safe food handling and preparation, are important to make sure your holiday is a happy one. The U.S. Department of Agriculture offers tips for handling, thawing and cooking turkey, as well as saving your leftovers.

Win a free dose of bravecto (and other cool prizes)

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During August, when you purchase a dose of Bravecto 3 month oral chew for dogs or Bravecto 3 month topical for cats, you will be entered to win 1 free dose of Bravecto for your cat or dog.

 

You will also receive 1 scratch off ticket for each purchase of Bravecto. Each ticket reveals a code that is entered in www.bravecto.com/askme. Prizes include:

 

 

Grand prize: 16″ x 16″ Warhol-style canvas print of your furry friend
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First Prize winners will receive their choice of an iFetch interactive ball launcher for dogs OR a U-pet cat carrier for cats.

 

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Second Place Prize winners will receive their choice of a Kyjen Outward Hound 9-piece Outdoor Agility Starter kit OR a PetFusion Ultimate Cat Scratcher Loung

Outward-Hound-Kyjen-41003-Zip-Zoom-Indoor-Dog             63376_MAIN._AC_SL1500_V1496863271_

 

 

 

Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Prevention Guide

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Bug off

Summer is in full force! And so are all the pesky bugs. Fleas, ticks, and other insects aren’t just nuisances for both pets and owners alike, they can also spread mild to fatal diseases. 

 

What are your options?

There are many different products on the market to prevent animal’s biggest problems: fleas and ticks. But which one is right for your pet?

Topical Prevention
Liquid drops that go on the back of your pets neck is one of the most common and affordable options to help prevent fleas and ticks. Topicals contain ingredients that use the natural oils on your pet’s skin and coat to spread the active ingredients, working through the hair follicles to spread it across the entire body. Most topical medications are non-prescription and applied monthly. Most topical medications do no repel fleas or ticks, but will kill the flea life cycle and kill a tick before it has time to transmit disease to your pet.

Oral Prevention
A pill or chew that must be ingested to travel through the pet’s blood stream. The fleas and ticks have to bite the animal to be killed off. Most oral medications are considered a prescription and last 1 – 3 months. Most oral preventions do not repel fleas or ticks, but will kill the flea life cycle and kill a tick before it has time to transmit disease to your pet.

Collars
A collar that is worn around your pet’s neck to repel and kill fleas and ticks. Most collars last 6 months or more. Most collars are considered non-prescription.

Sprays
Product that is sprayed directly on the pet’s fur to kill fleas. Can be time-consuming and not very effective, so best used as a last resort for pets too young for other products, pregnant animals, or in conjunction with a more effective, long-term product.

Shampoos
Shampoo that is specially medicated with permethrin, or pyrethrin (though ingredients vary by brand) to quickly kill fleas and/or ticks. Shampoos are not our go-to recommendation as it must be allowed to soak into the pet’s fur for at least 15 minutes and does not prevent re-infestation from parasites in the environment, and often as to be re-applied frequently.


 

Available at Animal Health Center

We carry a few different types of products in the office, including topical, oral, and collars.

We have a large selection on our online pharmacy, which can be found here and shipped right to your front door.


CanineProducts

Bravecto

With Bravecto Chew, dogs get 12 weeks of flea and tick protection with a single treatment. That’s nearly 3x longer than monthly treatments. This makes it easy for you to provide long-lasting coverage to your dog, without having to worry about remembering frequent treatments. With just one chew, your dog is all taken care of, so you can enjoy all of the activities you love to do together, without any worry for your dog.

 

Nexgard

Soft chew for dogs and puppies 8 weeks of age or older, weighing 4 pounds or more. Contains afoxolaner that kills both fleas and ticks quickly and keeps killing for a whole month.


Effitix

For convenient, quick-acting, long-lasting, effective control of fleasticksmosquitoes and lice. EFFITIX® Topical Solution for Dogs contains the active ingredients fipronil and permethrin, which control infestations caused by fleas, ticks and lice; repel against biting flies, and repel and kill mosquitoes.  Convenient to use, easy-to-apply topical solution that is quick-acting, long-lasting and starts working on contact.

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Scalibor Collar

An odorless, one size fits all collar with the active ingredient deltamethrin that provides long-lasting protection against ticks (up to six months) by killing all blood-feeding stages of ticks that may transmit serious diseases. It’s water resistant, so it can be worn when swimming.

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The 3 products listed above: Bravecto, Effitix, and Scalibor are available in the office. There are more options available on our online pharmacy.

website


Feline Products

Bravecto Topical

Knock out flea infestations in your home with just one dose. Kills 100% of fleas in 8 hours – and keeps killing them for a full 12 weeks. Bravecto is also proven to kill greater than 94% of black-legged ticks on cats after 48 hours of treatment for 12 weeks. And, kills greater than 98% of American dog ticks after 48 hours of treatment for 8 weeks.


Cheristin 

A topical flea control that starts killing fleas in 30 minutes, and kills 98–100% of fleas within 12 hours, and lasts a full month. Fast, effective, long-lasting protection for the cat you love.

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 Now that we’ve covered fleas and ticks, let’s talk about preventing heartworm disease!

 

 

Heartworm is a disease spread from dog to dog through a mosquito bite, causing up to foot-long worms that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected pets. Heartworm disease can led to severe lung disease, heart failure and can damage other organs in the body.

Heartworm disease is detected with a simple blood test.  Beginning at 1 year of age, we will begin testing your dog by taking a blood sample and performing a fast, in-house test, then annually. It takes at least 6-7 months for heartworm disease to show up on a test. We may recommend a test for dogs that are transported from high risk states 6 months after arriving in New England.

No one wants to hear that their dog has heartworm, but the good news is that most infected dogs can be successfully treated. The goal is to first stabilize your dog if he is showing signs of disease, then kill all adult and immature worms while keeping the side effects of treatment to a minimum.

Signs of heartworm disease may include a mild persistent cough, reluctance to exercise, fatigue after moderate activity, decreased appetite, and weight loss. As heartworm disease progresses, pets may develop heart failure and the appearance of a swollen belly due to excess fluid in the abdomen. Dogs with large numbers of heartworms can develop a sudden blockages of blood flow within the heart leading to a life-threatening form of cardiovascular collapse. This is called caval syndrome, and is marked by a sudden onset of labored breathing, pale gums, and dark bloody or coffee-colored urine. Without prompt surgical removal of the heartworm blockage, few dogs survive.

Monthly, year-round heartworm prevention is the only way to prevent this disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeling on heartworm preventives states that the medication is to be used by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. This means heartworm preventives must be purchased from your veterinarian after an annual physical wellness exam, and yearly heartworm testing.

Hearworm prevention also contains an ingredient to help prevent 2 more common intestinal parasites (roundworms and hookworms).


What flea and tick prevention your pet should be on depends on several factors: what kind of pet you have, the pet’s lifestyle, and your family. The knowledge of your primary veterinarian and their knowledge of your pet’s activities and your family allow them to recommend what product would best protect your pet and suit your family.

What are you actually buying? All of the products we carry are sold exclusively to veterinarians only. You can rest assured what you’re receiving from us genuine, purchased straight from the manufacturer and stored correctly, therefore holding maximum efficacy.

Purchasing flea, tick, and heartworm preventatives through your veterinarian is the only way to take advantage of savings and coupons. The manufacturer will not honor rebates if purchased through online pharmacies.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, we gaurantee our products. If your pet doesn’t like it, it’s not working, or you simply don’t like it – return it or exchange it. Also, the manufacturer may be willing to help cover any treatments associated with the efficacy of these products, if purchased from your veterinarian.

Half off enrollment of Wellness Plans in June

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Looking for a way to make affordable monthly payments for your pet’s wellness care?

 Animal Health Center’s Petly© Plans are a great budgeting tool!


 

Puppy & Kitten Wellness Plans

Puppies and kittens inherit a natural immunity from their mother that protects them from birth until about 6 weeks of age. After 6 weeks, your pet depends on you to continue that protection until their own immune system is fully developed. A Wellness Plan is designed to continue that protection by providing all services necessary to carry your young pet through the important first year of life.


Adult Dog & Cat Wellness Plans 

Dogs and cats age at a much faster rate than people. For every year that you age, your dog or cat can age from 6 to 8 years. Your pet’s medical and nutritional needs change as their bodies age. A Wellness Plan helps manage their evolving health care needs by allowing you to provide the preventative care needed on an annual basis with the convenience of an affordable monthly payment.



Disclaimer:

Wellness Plans only cover routine, non-medical exams. It cannot be used for illnesses, or surgery not listed in the service guide. You will be responsible for paying a separate fee for medical exams, and items not covered under the plan at the time services are rendered. The one-time sign up fee is NON-REFUNDABLE, unless you cancel in writing within 72 hours of registration. If you cancel the wellness plan early, all services received must be paid in full. The sign up fee does not count as payment for services. If you cannot pay for services your pet has received, payments will continue until contract end date, or when all services have been paid in full. The plan will renew every year automatically, unless you cancel in writing within 30 days of the renewal date. Sign up fee and first month’s payment is due at the time of registration, and all payments after sign up are automatically deducted on the 20th of each month. There is a $25 processing fee if your payment does not clear. Your payment will automatically be processed again every 3 business days, until it clears. The program requires a primary and secondary forms of payment (i.e. check account and major credit card).  In the event that a payment does not clear from the primary account chosen by the client, the payment will be deducted from the secondary account provided. Items are non-transferrable and can only be used for the patient in which it was originally intended.


Click HERE for more information

We are TICKED off about lyme disease.

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10 % OFF 3 months of tick prevention when lyme vaccine is current.


Lyme Borreliosis in Dogs

Lyme disease is one of the most common tick-borne diseases in the world but only causes symptoms in 5-10% of affected dogs. It is caused by a spirochete (bacteria) species of the Borrelia burgdorferi group. When infection leads to disease in dogs, the dominant clinical feature is recurrent lameness due to inflammation of the joints. There may also be a lack of appetite and depression. More serious complications include damage to the kidneys, and rarely, heart or nervous system disease.

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Symptoms of Lyme Disease in Dogs

Many dogs who develop Lyme disease have recurrent lameness due to inflammation of the joints. Sometimes the lameness lasts for only three to four days but recurs days to weeks later, either in the same leg or in other legs. This is known as “shifting-leg lameness.” One or more joints may be swollen, warm, and painful.

Some dogs may also develop kidney problems. Lyme disease sometimes leads to glomerulonephritis – inflammation and accompanying dysfunction of the kidney’s glomeruli (essentially, a blood filter). Eventually, kidney failure may set in as the dog begins to exhibit such signs as vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, weight loss, increased urination and thirst, and abnormal fluid buildups.

Other symptoms associated with Lyme disease in dogs include:

  • Stiff walk with an arched back
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fever, lack of appetite, and depression
  • Superficial lymph nodes close to the site of the infecting tick bite may be swollen
  • Heart abnormalities are reported, but rare
  • Nervous system complications (rare)

Causes of Lyme Disease in Dogs

Borrelia burgdorferi, which is the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease in dogs, is transmitted by slow-feeding, hard-shelled deer ticks (Ixodes spp.). Infection typically occurs after the Borrelia-carrying tick has been attached to the dog for at 36-48 hours.

Diagnosing Lyme Disease in Dogs

You will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health, including a background of symptoms and possible incidents that might have precipitated them. The history you provide may give your veterinarian clues as to which organs are being affected. Your veterinarian may run some combination of blood chemistry tests, a complete blood cell count, a urinalysis, fecal examinations, X-rays, and tests specific to diagnosing Lyme disease (e.g., serology). Fluid from the affected joints may also be drawn for analysis.

There are many causes for arthritis, and your veterinarian will focus on differentiating arthritis initiated by Lyme disease from other inflammatory arthritic disorders, such as trauma, degenerative joint disease, or osteochondrosis dissecans (a condition found in large, fast growing breeds of puppies). Immune-mediated diseases will also be considered as a possible cause of the symptoms. An X-ray of the painful joints will allow your doctor to examine the bones for abnormalities.

Treating Dog Lyme Disease

If the diagnosis is Lyme disease, your dog will be treated as an outpatient unless their condition is unstable (e.g., severe kidney disease). Doxycycline is the most common antibiotic that is prescribed for Lyme disease, but others are also available and effective.  The recommended treatment length is usually four weeks, but longer courses may be necessary in some cases. Your veterinarian may also prescribe an anti-inflammatory (pain reliever) if your dog is especially uncomfortable.

Unfortunately, antibiotic treatment does not always completely eliminate infection with Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. Symptoms may resolve but then return at a later date, and the development of kidney disease in the future is always a worry.

Living and Management

Improvement in sudden (acute) inflammation of the joints caused by Borrelia should be seen within three to five days of antibiotic treatment. If there is no improvement within three to five days, your veterinarian will want to reevaluate your dog.

Preventing Lyme Disease in Dogs

If possible, avoid allowing your dog to roam in tick-infested environments where Lyme disease is common. Check your dog’s coat and skin daily and remove ticks. Keep your pet on a prescription for tick prevention year-round and keep your pet vaccinated with lyme vaccine.

We currently have several different options in hospital or to purchase from our online pharamcy. Bravecto is a 3 month oral chew that has proven successful with our patients over the last couple of years. After you give your pet Bravecto, it quickly reaches tissue fluids just under your dog’s or cat’s skin. When fleas and ticks feed, they ingest Bravecto and die. Bravecto Chew for Dogs starts killing fleas within 2 hours, and kills ticks within 12 hours. Bravecto Chew for Dogs kills fleas, prevents flea infestations, and kills ticks (black-legged tick, American dog tick and brown dog tick) for 12 weeks. Bravecto Chew for Dogs also kills lone star ticks for 8 weeks. Bravecto Topical Solution for Cats kills 100% of fleas within 8 hours. 

Seresto is an 8 month collar available from our online pharmacy. Seresto collar kills and repels fleas before they lay eggs, kills and repels ticks, aids in the treatment and control of sarcoptic mange, kills chewing lice, and is water resistant.

Lyme Vaccine

A vaccine is available to help aid in the protection against lyme disease and/or the worsening of symptoms caused by the disease. As we are in a high endemic area, we recommend vaccinating against lyme vaccine for most all canine patients. If your pet has never had a vaccine, or it’s been over 6 weeks since the last vaccine – it’s recommended that 2 injections be given 2-4 weeks apart, then annually.

 

 

 

 

Heartworm disease is heartbreaking

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Meet Remington.

A shelter found him wandering the streets of Louisiana and luckily was only in the shelter about a month before he was adopted by the Cook family, and brought home to New England in Dec 2015. Remington had a negative heartworm test before he left the shelter. He tested positive for heartworm disease at his annual wellness exam in March 2017 and has already begun treatment. He was on heartworm prevention, although his owners admit he may have missed a dose in the winter months. They also report he showed no outwardly signs of having heartworm disease, stating, ” He seems perfectly normal, youthful, happy, fun-loving lab!” 

We caught the disease early and we are sure he will make a full recovery, but the treatment is expensive, time-consuming, and requires strict activity restriction for many months.

 

Remington Cook


What is heartworm disease?

Disease caused by foot-long worms (heartworms) that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected pets, causing severe lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs in the body.

 worms

Who is at risk?

Cats, dogs, and ferrets.

cat-dog-ferret

What causes heartworm disease?

Mosquitoes.

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What are the symptoms of heartworm disease?

n the early stages of the disease, many dogs show few symptoms or no symptoms at all. The longer the infection persists, the more likely symptoms will develop. Active dogs, dogs heavily infected with heartworms, or those with other health problems often show pronounced clinical signs.

Signs of heartworm disease may include a mild persistent cough, reluctance to exercise, fatigue after moderate activity, decreased appetite, and weight loss. As heartworm disease progresses, pets may develop heart failure and the appearance of a swollen belly due to excess fluid in the abdomen. Dogs with large numbers of heartworms can develop a sudden blockages of blood flow within the heart leading to a life-threatening form of cardiovascular collapse. This is called caval syndrome, and is marked by a sudden onset of labored breathing, pale gums, and dark bloody or coffee-colored urine. Without prompt surgical removal of the heartworm blockage, few dogs survive.

TranqSedation

How is heartworm disease diagnosed?

A simple blood test. Beginning at 1 year of age, we will begin testing your dog by taking a blood sample and performing a fast, in-house test, then annually. It takes at least 6-7 months for heartworm disease to show up on a test. We may recommend a test for dogs that are transported from high risk states 6 months after arriving in New England.

blood-draw-on-dog

What if my dog tests positive?

No one wants to hear that their dog has heartworm, but the good news is that most infected dogs can be successfully treated. The goal is to first stabilize your dog if he is showing signs of disease, then kill all adult and immature worms while keeping the side effects of treatment to a minimum.

Here’s what you should expect if your dog tests positive:

  • Confirm the diagnosis. Once a dog tests positive on an antigen test, the diagnosis should be confirmed with an additional—and different—test. Because the treatment regimen for heartworm is both expensive and complex, your veterinarian will want to be absolutely sure that treatment is necessary.
  • Restrict exercise. This requirement might be difficult to adhere to, especially if your dog is accustomed to being active. But your dog’s normal physical activities must be restricted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, because physical exertion increases the rate at which the heartworms cause damage in the heart and lungs. The more severe the symptoms, the less activity your dog should have.
  • Stabilize your dog’s disease. Before actual heartworm treatment can begin, your dog’s condition may need to be stabilized with appropriate therapy. In severe cases of heartworm disease, or when a dog has another serious condition, the process can take several months.
  • Administer treatment. Once your veterinarian has determined your dog is stable and ready for heartworm treatment, he or she will recommend a treatment protocol involving several steps. The American Heartworm Society has guidelines for developing this plan of attack. Dogs with no signs or mild signs of heartworm disease, such as cough or exercise intolerance, have a high success rate with treatment. More severe disease can also be successfully treated, but the possibility of complications is greater. The severity of heartworm disease does not always correlate with the severity of symptoms, and dogs with many worms may have few or no symptoms early in the course of the disease.
  • Test (and prevent) for success. Approximately 6 months after treatment is completed, your veterinarian will perform a heartworm test to confirm that all heartworms have been eliminated. To avoid the possibility of your dog contracting heartworm disease again, you will want to administer heartworm prevention year-round for the rest of his life.

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Is there a way to prevent heartworm disease?

Yes! Give your pet monthly, year-round heartworm preventative starting as a puppy, and continue for life!

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Do I need a prescription?

Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeling on heartworm preventives states that the medication is to be used by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. This means heartworm preventives must be purchased from your veterinarian after an annual physical wellness exam, and yearly heartworm testing.

Clinic

Where can I learn more information about heartworm disease?

Click here to visit the American Heartworm Society’s website.

During the month of April, Animal health center is offering 20% your dog’s heartworm test when you also purhcase a year supply of heartworm prevention.

TEXT HERE

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$10 Off Microchips in March

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Tiny Microchip, Huge Protection

A microchip is your pet’s permanent ID. A pet microchip—the size of a grain of rice—goes beneath your pet’s skin. This permanent ID can never be removed or become impossible to read. This ID is used to contact you and reunite you with your pet. This tiny device provides your pet with permanent identification to give them the best chance of coming home.


Every two seconds a family companion is lost.

Tragically many never make it back home because they lack identification. A microchip along with a collar and identification tag are the best ways to ensure you and your companion will be quickly reunited.

What is a microchip and how does it work?

  • A microchip is a non-removable form of identification.
  • About the size of a grain of rice, a microchip contains a personal identification number that stays with your companion animal forever.
  • The microchip is inserted under the skin of your companion with an injection and it is a safe and easy procedure.
  • A microchip is not a GPS tracking device. The location of a lost animal cannot be tracked or determined from the microchip.
  • The technology inside a microchip is the same as bar codes found on thousands of products we use every day. It is similar the grocery store being able to scan the bar code on a food item, and then information showing up on the cash register screen. Instead of it saying “bag of potato chips” it will show a series of numbers and letters that is unique to your animal’s record.
  • When a lost animal is found, he can be taken to a local animal shelter, veterinary office, or animal control agency and examined with a hand-held scanner that reads the number specific to your animal. That unique code is connected to your name and contact information.
  • To read the microchip’s bar code, a hand-held scanner is used. The scanner can only be used when the animal is physically present, and only shelters, veterinarians and animal control officers have this type of scanner.
  • Once the microchip has been read, a phone call to the microchip manufacturer allows us to find out who the animal is registered to so we can begin the process of reuniting the lost pet with their family.
  • Most microchip manufacturers also maintain a national registration database with a telephone hotline. Contact the manufacturer for more information.

Why microchip my pet if she already wears a collar and tag?

Collars can fall off or break, tags can be lost or wear off so they are illegible. A combination of a microchip, properly fitting collar and current identification tag, and keeping your companion properly confined, are the best insurance policies you can provide to keep your animal friend safe. An added benefit: In many communities, the cost of a pet license is reduced when the cat or dog is also microchipped.

Help me get home sooner. Microchip me.

22 Lowell. St

Rochester, NH 03867

603-332-3358

www.animalhealthcenternh.com

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February Is Pet Dental Health Month

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10% off dental cleanings & free dental home care kit

during February! Now that’s something to smile about!

 


Does your pet have bad breath? Unfortunately, most pets do and this is not normal. The foul odor you smell is caused by an infection in their mouth. The most common cause of infection in your pet’s mouth is periodontal disease, which affects over 75% of pets over 2 years of age. Periodontal disease is a progressive and irreversible loss of the structures surrounding the teeth caused by chronic infection and inflammation in the mouth. When your pet eats, residual food particles in the mouth promote growth of bacteria. The bacteria form a slime layer, known as plaque, which attaches to the teeth and hardens to form tartar and calculus

The first step in treating periodontal disease requires cleaning the teeth and surrounding tissues. Because your pet will not lie down quietly for a dental cleaning, general anesthesia is required. To prepare anesthesia, your veterinarian will do a thorough examination of your pet, perform blood work and discuss the procedure with you. Your pet will be monitored closely throughout the entire procedure: your pet’s safety is our primary concern. After the teeth are cleaned, X-rays will be taken of the teeth to check for pathology hiding below the gum line . Your veterinarian will discuss with you any other procedures that may need to be performed.

 

Healthy periodontal tissue is free of infection, inflammation and odor. Keeping the mouth healthy requires a combination of:

 

      – Developing a home dental care plan that works for you and your pet

     –  Annual to bi-annual examinations by your veterinarian to evaluate the home dental care plan

     –  Annual professional teeth cleaning.

             (Some breeds (e.g.: small breeds) may require more frequent cleanings. Just as people need their teeth cleaned regularly, your pet does too.)

      – Daily brushing with pet toothpaste (do not use toothpaste made for people)

      – Dental formulated diets, water additives and dental chews


Space is limited, call today!

Your Friends at

22 Lowell St.

Rochester, NH 03867

603-332-3358

www.animalhealthcenternh.com

50% off wellness plan enrollment during January

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Looking for a way to make affordable monthly payments for your pet’s wellness care?

 Animal Health Center’s Petly© Plans are a great budgeting tool!


 

Puppy & Kitten Wellness Plans

Puppies and kittens inherit a natural immunity from their mother that protects them from birth until about 6 weeks of age. After 6 weeks, your pet depends on you to continue that protection until their own immune system is fully developed. A Wellness Plan is designed to continue that protection by providing all services necessary to carry your young pet through the important first year of life.


Adult Dog & Cat Wellness Plans 

Dogs and cats age at a much faster rate than people. For every year that you age, your dog or cat can age from 6 to 8 years. Your pet’s medical and nutritional needs change as their bodies age. A Wellness Plan helps manage their evolving health care needs by allowing you to provide the preventative care needed on an annual basis with the convenience of an affordable monthly payment.



Disclaimer:

Wellness Plans only cover routine, non-medical exams. It cannot be used for illnesses, or surgery not listed in the service guide. You will be responsible for paying a separate fee for medical exams, and items not covered under the plan at the time services are rendered. The one-time sign up fee is NON-REFUNDABLE, unless you cancel in writing within 72 hours of registration. If you cancel the wellness plan early, all services received must be paid in full. The sign up fee does not count as payment for services. If you cannot pay for services your pet has received, payments will continue until contract end date, or when all services have been paid in full. The plan will renew every year automatically, unless you cancel in writing within 30 days of the renewal date. Sign up fee and first month’s payment is due at the time of registration, and all payments after sign up are automatically deducted on the 20th of each month. There is a $25 processing fee if your payment does not clear. Your payment will automatically be processed again every 3 business days, until it clears. The program requires a primary and secondary forms of payment (i.e. check account and major credit card).  In the event that a payment does not clear from the primary account chosen by the client, the payment will be deducted from the secondary account provided. Items are non-transferrable and can only be used for the patient in which it was originally intended.


Click HERE for more information

Pet Food Drive

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December Pet Food Drive

Bring in cans or bags of dog or cat food during December for an entry into a free giveaway. Prizes include treats for you and your pet! Also includes a gift certificate to the Animal Health Center. Food can be donated at our office.

Donations will go to Cocheco Valley Humane Society, their wish list includes:

Dry Purina cat food
Wet cat food (any brand)
Pedigree wet dog food
Dry Pedigree or Purina dog food
Wet dog food (any brand)
Rabbit food
Guinea pig food

If you are unable to make it by the office to drop off a donation, please consider making an online donation by visiting their website:

http://www.cvhsonline.org/makeadonation.cfm